Women's Imaging Procedures

The Abington Advantage

  • Breast Imaging Center of Excellence Award, American College of Radiology
  • National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers Award, American College of Surgeons
  • Recognized by Susan G. Komen Foundation for our excellent care
  • All breast imaging facilities are accredited by the American College of Radiology

Image guided breast biopsies are performed by specially trained interventional breast radiologists at the Mary T. Sachs Breast Center and at Lansdale Hospital. Preoperative needle localizations prior to excisional biopsies are performed by specialized radiologists at the Mary T. Sachs Breast Center, Lansdale Hospital and Abington Memorial Hospital.

A Fast Track Program for patients requiring image guided biopsies is available at all Abington Health sites. This program includes individual patient consultations with radiologists, a nurse navigator and a nurse coordinator at the time of a suspicious diagnosis and provides expedited scheduling for pre procedure surgical consultations prior to image guided biopsies.

We have one of the largest volumes for breast imaging procedures in the Delaware Valley. Our teams of highly competent professionals including technologists, nurses, clerical staff and physicians are dedicated to providing excellent, comprehensive, compassionate care to all.

NAPB Accredited

Breast Excellence Accredited

ACR Breast MRI accreditationBreast Ultrasound ACR Accredited

 

Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

Pink RibbonUltrasound guided breast biopsy is a minimally invasive method for diagnosing breast cancers in their earliest stages. The radiologist uses ultrasound to locate the area for biopsy and to direct the needle used in collecting breast tissue samples.

Vacuum assisted ultrasound-guided breast biopsy is as accurate as a surgical biopsy and is performed with local anesthetic on an outpatient basis, taking less than 40 minutes to perform and requiring no stitches. Furthermore, the patient can resume normal, non-strenuous activities immediately after the procedure is done. The samples are sent to the pathology lab for analysis. Results are usually available within a few days.

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Stereotactic-Guided Breast Biopsy

ACR Accreditation Stereotactic Guided BiopsyStereotactic breast biopsy is a minimally invasive method for diagnosing breast cancers in their earliest stages. This biopsy method is often used for clustered calcifications that have newly developed or increased over time in the breast.  Early breast cancers may present on mammography as a grouping of microcalcifications. The stereotactic table is specially designed so that you can lay face-down with one breast positioned through a hole in the table. Two digital x-ray images are taken from different angles, allowing the radiologist to precisely localize the area to biopsied. Once the area has been located, the radiologist numbs the area with a local anesthetic, and then uses computer guidance for precise targeting and core needle placement and collection of small tissue samples.

Stereotactic-guided breast biopsy is vacuum assisted and is as accurate as a surgical biopsy .It is performed on an outpatient basis, taking less than 60 minutes to perform and requiring no stitches. Furthermore, the patient can resume normal, non-strenuous activities immediately after the procedure is done. The samples are sent to the pathology lab for analysis. Results are usually available within a few days.

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MRI-Guided Breast Biopsy

We can perform a vacuum assisted core needle biopsy in the MRI suite if a lesion is detected only on a Breast MRI exam, This is performed as an outpatient procedure under local anesthetic similar to the other image guided breast biopsies.

Breast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

Breast MRI is a noninvasive diagnostic test that may be ordered to distinguish between benign and malignant breast lesions, thus potentially reducing the need for breast biopsy. While Breast MRI is not a replacement for mammography or ultrasound, it often provides additional information about the breast that can not be obtained using these two methods. MRI is a technique using a very strong magnet and radio waves to pick up signals from the breast tissue. We use state-of-the-art equipment including a dedicated bilateral breast surface coil. The patient lies face-down within the scanning field for approximately 25 minutes. The primary way that abnormal tissue stands out on MRI is because it gets more blood flow than the remaining tissue. We can detect blood flow by taking images before and after infusion of an intravenous substance (gadolinium) that is easily seen on MRI. Breast MRI is most useful in detecting breast cancer and evaluating the integrity of implants. Breast MRI is often employed in patients with a known breast cancer in whom there is a question about how extensive the disease is. Breast MRI can also be utilized for screening certain high risk individuals. Medical indications (reasons) for breast MRI are evolving, and are the subject of many studies around the country.  In pre-menopausal women without a diagnosis of breast cancer, the optimal time for breast MRI is days 7-14 of the menstrual cycle so artifacts can be minimized.

We utilize a special computer-assisted detection (CAD) program designed for the processing and interpretation of Breast MRI Images.

Dual core breast MRI procedures are performed at Abington Memorial Hospital and are interpreted at Abington Memorial Hospital and at the Mary T. Sachs Breast Center.

Ductography

A ductogram, also called a galactogram, is a test done if you are having persistent nipple discharge from a single duct, and your mammogram is normal. A tiny needle is inserted into the duct opening in the nipple and a tiny amount of iodine contrast dye is injected into the duct. Several mammogram pictures are then obtained, with the ducts outlined by the iodine contrast dye. This shows whether there is anything inside the duct which could be producing the discharge. Most women report that although uncomfortable, the procedure is not painful.

DEXA - (Bone Densitometry)

To accurately detect osteoporosis, doctors commonly use DEXA bone densitometry to measure bone mineral density (BMD). It is most often used to diagnose osteoporosis, a degenerative disease that causes bones to become brittle and at increased risk for fracture. DEXA is a quick, painless procedure for measuring bone loss. Measurement of the lower spine and hips are most often done.

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Galactography (Ductography)

 

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast

 

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Mammography

 

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Breast Ultrasound

 

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